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Building some MFH projects
Joel_W
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Posted: Saturday, January 11, 2020 - 02:29 AM UTC
Nick,
Looking at your picture of the 3 Porsches, I believe that the top one is a open cockpit 908/2 from the late 1960s. She really looks fantastic as you nailed the paint job. Is that the old Union kit, or a limited run multi media kit?

When ever I've seen pictures of those endurance cars, I often wondered just how much air turbulence the drivers had to deal with at high speeds. I'm sure that the nose pushed most of the killer air flow over the driver's head, but surely some buffeting had to happen. I remember my 1st time trial at Bridgehampton in my MGB (no windshield, just a small plexi homemade deflector), and I was wearing the traditional open face helmet, Goggles, bandana over my mouth to keep crap and bugs out, and a sun visor brim. Down the back straight it felt like my head was being ripped off. Tore that brim right off the helmet and tossed it right there.

Joel


Joel
AussieReg
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Posted: Friday, January 10, 2020 - 12:08 PM UTC
Hi Nick.

I'm loving this build, the little niggles just give it more character! As you said, take a break, a little diversion can only do you good.

With regard to the DNF - (Accident), it's the MARTINI Racing Team, what do you expect? At least they crashed smiling

Cheers, D
Hwa-Rang
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Posted: Thursday, January 09, 2020 - 12:18 AM UTC
Bummer about those decals. Did the clear coat split as well, or "just" the decals? did you paint, the body, with acrylics?
Joel_W
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Posted: Wednesday, January 08, 2020 - 03:09 PM UTC
Nick,
The decal issue really sucks. Been there, had the same results, and believe me I know exactly how you feel. And yes, I took off a little time to regroup. Then back to my disaster.

What I did was to find some AM decals, and I'm positive for such a popular car as the 908/3 they're out there. Both times I had to strip the body. In this case it's not attached except for the lower sills. I'm sure that you can strip them, and with careful masking repaint.

As for your build, you know exactly how I feel about the job you did. Impressive doesn't do it justice.

I haven't a clue as to why the fit got out of wack, but again, I've been there. My 956 has the tail engine cover off for that exact reason. I'd display it with the engine deck up and the front deck off to show of the chassis and details.

I'm right here for you if I can help in any way.

Joel
Cosimodo
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Posted: Wednesday, January 08, 2020 - 11:36 AM UTC
Hi Nick, I am sorry to read, and see, the troubles with the decals. I know how gutting that can be but the car itself looks great and from the normal viewing distance viewers would probably never notice the issues.
The Martini colour scheme looks quite restrained against their later depictions and looks good against the silver, and a great contrast to your other racing Porsches.

cheers
Michael
Stickframe
#362
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Posted: Wednesday, January 08, 2020 - 11:20 AM UTC
Hello gents,

I finished the 908 a few days before Christmas, but haven't had any time to post an update - so, here we go:







A nice attribute of MFH kits is that effort is made to make sure that the kit correctly reflects a particular car, in this case the 908/3, number 8, that raced in 1971. As you can see above this car was raced, looked good on the curvy hill climb course, but ultimately DNF - apparently hit a rock and damaged the right front suspension. Too bad! It sure looked good, started with a good position on the grid, and Vic Elford is pretty highly regarded as a driver - as they say, just another day at the races.

Now, on to mine. Funny twist of fate here - I was just about satisfied with my nearly OK body work - when alas, a big, PITA distraction emerged - decals that fractured and wouldn't set. Perfect. And, yes, it has a correct finish on the body/paint, and not one but two types of setting solution were tried: No luck. Yes, this irked me - but, I wish I was taller and wealthy too....take a look:







And, yes - there was a clear coat over these! Weird eh? the word "Porsche" was complete at one time...I'm guessing the clear coat must have been all that was holding this decal on and it just flicked off while polishing...nice.





The picture above is particularly galling. If you go back to the build you'll see I went of my way to carefully adapt/adjust the rear fender well and the flare - upper and lower - to match. I did, and miraculously it worked and looks great. Uh, except for the number 8 which magically became unaligned while handling, and had part of the top flick off. I did't notice the misalignment until after it was clear coated....again, nice.

Ok - enough whining - back to the car:











Problems with decals or not as whole this was a very challenging build which might even look better without the body (and obviously decals) on!

As the real car was a DNF, because it apparently hit a rock or something, I decided I could add some dust and wear to distract from the glaring mess that is the decals:



And for some scale, with some similar vintage Porsche's:



OK, for now I'm taking a breather from the MFH - I built a 911 GT1 immediately after, with lots of complicated decals, which worked fine, and am starting a new scratch project. I'll restart this post in a month or two or whenever I'm ready to try again.

Cheers

Nick











Joel_W
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Posted: Friday, December 20, 2019 - 09:51 AM UTC
Nick,
Just an amazing build to date. I'm just super impressed. I'll be waiting for your final post as I can't wait to see those Gulf colors on the body shell.

I should hang my head in shame as my progress on the Mustang is so slow these days, but I'm getting there. Update hopefully this weekend.

Joel
AussieReg
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Posted: Thursday, December 19, 2019 - 12:41 PM UTC
Nick, every progress update on this build has been awesome. The level of detail and complexity along with the mixture of media in the parts takes thus type of kit to another level. Iím really looking forward to seeing the final update.

Have a happy and safe break and we will see you on the other side.

Cheers, D
Cosimodo
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Posted: Thursday, December 19, 2019 - 12:21 PM UTC
Just looks amazing Nick! The level of detail is what attracts me to MFH, not sure about the complexity of it. Looking forward to the final pictures in 2020. Have a good break.

cheers
Michael
Stickframe
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Posted: Thursday, December 19, 2019 - 10:05 AM UTC
HI Joel and David,

Thanks - yes, I've got to say, while this build process requires a fair amount of commitment by the model builder, the results are pretty nice. I should not have started my adventures with MFH with this kit - I think I dove into the proverbial deep end of the pool a bit too soon. Live and learn I guess. No, that doesn't mean that I'll buy another of the 908s and try again. I have a few MFH kits - as I mentioned at the start of this, I've been buying a kit or two a year for a while - so I have others that are more or less complex. I'll wait a while to start the 917!

Jesper - good eye - I spaced on the steering wheel - so, I pulled it out, steering column and all, which of course is funny because when I put it together, the wheel would not stay on - well, now it does, and it has a few lightening holes drilled through it:



and you can see other body parts making their way onto the chassis, but that assembly isn't done yet - instead, more and more bits and paint detailing - tail lights, and more shades of silver (50??? lol):





There you have it to date. I like the exhaust tips - those are resin parts and painted up nicely. The tail lights are a foggy resin and look pretty good too.

OK - I suspect I'll finish this in the next few days, but probably won't post again until after the first of the year -

Cheers and looking forward to a better 2020!!!
Happy model building and best wishes to all -

Nick
Hwa-Rang
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Posted: Monday, December 16, 2019 - 09:58 PM UTC
The amount of details are just mind blowing. Will you paint or drill out the holes, in the spokes, of the steering wheel?
Dixon66
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Posted: Monday, December 16, 2019 - 01:38 PM UTC
What Joel said is enough for me too. Wow!
Joel_W
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Posted: Monday, December 16, 2019 - 09:47 AM UTC
Nick,
I'm truly speechless, the build is that good

I just can't believe my eyes how super detailed this kit is, and how well you've executed the build to get this far. All I want to know is when do you add some gas and test fire the engine up?

Joel

Stickframe
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Posted: Monday, December 16, 2019 - 08:50 AM UTC
HI Joel,

Thanks, yes, the little bits that keep the whole thing together! I don't know about you, but if given enough time, I'll knock parts like that clean off the kit. In fact, I probably still will!! it drives me nuts.

OK, on to some progress - the rear canopy:



Try as I might, I couldn't get the upper and lower fender archs to match - so, I opted for some cutting. The actual difference is less dramatic than this cut line suggests, in fact it's about half of the distance shown. Except, these fenders have a flare projecting outward, so I needed to cut deep enough to allow me to add the flare, to match with its counterpart on the lower section. The cut and fill worked out fine on both sides - in fact, I went so far as to add two fine wire (.015") pins in each to keep them from getting knocked off.

And, below you'll see some progress, including the rocker panels below the cabin - painted, clear coated, and installed:





These need to be installed before the front or rear body parts can be fitted/installed. As this will take lots of handling, forcing, and cajoling parts together, I made sure the decals were on and all was clear coated!! I don't want to screw up the finish. These panels by the way, are screwed onto the drivers area with four, self tapping 1.4 mm screws - yes, as the fit of course takes some finessing, this is a bit nerve wracking.

And, while at it, I kept going with painting of odds and ends - added some more materials, and so on:













I like the mix of colors and materials on this kit - and I don't look forward to, or really want to, install the removable body parts, covering all of this up! They pack an awful lot into a 1/24 kit!

My next steps include getting the body painted and on without destroying the build.

Fingers crossed -

Happy model building -

Cheers
Nick





Joel_W
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Posted: Friday, December 13, 2019 - 02:32 AM UTC
Nick,
You're selling your abilities way short. Honestly, those retainers for the hinges and pins are way beyond my skill level. The fit perfectly, look perfect, and if you didn't tell us that you made them, I'd bet that they came with the kit. What's more they should really help to secure those parts to the rear deck.

Joel
Stickframe
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Posted: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 - 08:46 AM UTC
Hi gents,

Thanks for having a look -

D, I'm sure you'd power right through one of these! it seems that one of the biggest factors in getting these done is positive mind set, followed closely by patience!

Hi Joel, again, I appreciate your optimism! I'm still not willing to speak the words, "yes, it will work fine" hahha thanks -

In the meantime, some pics of about half of what I'm doing so far.

This is the rear canopy - don't be fooled by the top two pics:





Famous last words, "sure looks good!" - - I'm not convinced at all just yet. First, it took a long time to get this to even sit flat. The tube chassis was a bit warped horizontally, at the top, meaning the wheels sit flat on the bottom, but the canopy on top, didn't. Let the terror begin - apply steady, gradually increasing force on the chassis in an effort to bend the top of the frame, while not destroying it. It worked.

Next, on the underside of the canopy - there are four key locating and connecting points:



As you can see, there are two pins in the rear, and two arms for hinges in the front. These are to be glued into subtle indentations in the resin canopy. This works fine, but having been around my own builds long enough, I am fully confident that these points would snap off during fitting, and then during use. So, I used scrap brass photoetch material to make retainers, as shown below:



Above, you can see a connection for the hinge arm - glued flush on the canopy, and curved to match the curve on either side of the arm, ideally holding it in place.

Next:



In the rear are these locating pins that lift in and out of the chassis receiving points - what could go wrong here?? I'd knock them off, that's what! so, more brass retainers. For these, I made little two prong forks, that wrap the base of the pin, covering a base that is wider than the pin itself.

Challenges for this bold move: Cut an opening in the retainer that is the right size....then, make a "Z" fold in the sheet brass, that steps off the base of the pin that lands flush to the resin canopy....CA prefers to work on flush surface to surface connections - cheating doesn't work, I've tried.

In the meantime, I painted up the rocker panels and some other parts - these are sitting in my laundry room, near the hot water heater right now - why you ask? It's raining here - and the acrylic finish wouldn't dry with all the humidity! lol - so, as I'm at work now, I'm hoping these will be baked/finished when I get home, so that I can apply my water based, acrylic clear coat! what could go wrong??

Cheers and happy model building -

Nick



Joel_W
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Posted: Tuesday, December 10, 2019 - 09:17 AM UTC
Nick,
I have complete faith in you. I'm 101% positive that you'll get the body parts to fit like a glove. Now if was me, it would be a whole different story.

Joel
AussieReg
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Posted: Tuesday, December 10, 2019 - 08:05 AM UTC
Yeah, I'm having enough trouble with 50-odd bits of old AMT styrene. I'm truly unsure if I would survive one of these kits

Looks amazing mate, super work.

Cheers, D
Stickframe
#362
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Posted: Tuesday, December 10, 2019 - 07:52 AM UTC
Hi Joel,

Well, maybe in the ďright handsĒ the pieces fit like a glove, just not in mine!

That said, the parts are quite well thought out, and almost despite the complexity do go together. The properties of the materials give you a run for your money! The metal is fairly bendable, but not soft, so even while cleaning up you can accidentally reshape the piece - or, while assembling....if you look at the rollbar above, youíll see a dip in the middle - yes, now itís straight again!

As for the body parts fitting together, I really appreciate your vote of confidence, but Iím still nervous. In addition to the general fit, of course each part includes a mix of brackets and pins to hold them together - these assemblies are not as robust as those you can scratchbuild with styrene - the connections held together with CA have a predicable likelihood of shearing off. This is especially common on white metal/resin butt joints. Where possible Iíll add pins, but the resin materials are pretty thin - hmmmm, what to do???

Iím still adding stuff to the engine, and painting, while slowly moving in parallel with the body parts. Iím going to start with the rocker panels, which if nothing else will serve to help strengthen the overall assembly, I think.

Ok, keep going on your mustang! I still want to see how you handle the air filter and drivers area

Cheers
Nick
Joel_W
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Posted: Monday, December 09, 2019 - 08:58 AM UTC
Nick,
By just looking at the pictures of that amazing chassis and engine, one would surely guess ( me of course), that the MFH kit while complicated with all those separate rods and tubes and things, fits like a glove. I've been just amazed at your skill level, and focus. Now I know that you're indeed human .

what I see is an excellent build to your super high standards. I'm willing to bet that you get all the body panels to fit just fine.

Joel
Stickframe
#362
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Posted: Monday, December 09, 2019 - 08:27 AM UTC
Hi Joel -

haha - you misunderstood - I was running in and out with my model and a spray can! Glad to report, the etch primer seems to have done the trick in terms of keeping gray primer, and paint on the model, despite my many efforts to ruin it.

The bigger problems didn't have much to do with paint.

I built the motor and rear chassis as instructed in the kit, and test fit the two several times along the way; nonetheless, when the time came - nope, nothing would fit, and in efforts to "encourage" fitting, I of course popped items apart.

This misery broadly occurred in a three step process - first, getting the engine into the chassis; second, adding rear axle shafts and suspension, and third, seeing if the body parts would fit.

The engine eventually made it's way in, and is fairly stable.

For whatever reason, the left rear side of the suspension refused to go together - twice! The first time was when I was trying to assemble it. Initially it "looked" like it all went together (all 8 pieces! per side, not including brakes or wheel sub assembly) - but, the joke was on me - it didn't, and while trying to "fix" it, the lower control arm, which was once part of one piece that included the lower control arms on both sides of the car and cross member attached to the chassis, snapped off.

I tore the side apart, did an ample amount of clean up, drilling and adding small metal pins, rebuilt the control arm/chassis assembly and rebuilt the left side. Good to go! until, I realized my "fix" wasn't square or plumb. I tried to "sort of" pressure/bend/flex it into place, and, broke the left rear again. Perfect. So, repeat the above and now - miraculously, it sits flat!









And below - yes, it actually sits flat:



I guess I shouldn't need to make such a big deal out of this, but honestly - I was pretty sure this not be anywhere near flat!

Not to worry though, not out of the modelling woods just yet, I then decided to test fit some body pieces - just for fun. No, that wasn't and still isn't fun. The kit only has about six body parts - really nice resin, and four white metal parts - as before "how hard could it be" to put them all together?

Well, not that hard, unless you get annoyed or frustrated by knocking chassis members off time and time again - lol - quite a handful! And, sadly, I'm reaching the conclusion that try as I might, I don't think I'll achieve a clean fit for the rear canopy - of course, I can't specifically tell this exactly, but, I'm seeing alignment problems already - not huge, but of course, I just can't quite figure out how to resolve them.

So, I learned, that if I build another of these tube chassis, which I eventually will for a 1/24 917k, I will fasten key structural elements of the chassis together with metal pins. I've discovered the overall fit of the parts is pretty good, but, with enough handling etc, key elements "pop" apart. So, an easy enough fix is to cut off the locating pins and replace them with metal rods, and drill out the locating holes a bit to accept the replacement longer rods/locating pins.

This adds time to the parts you are doing it to, but, these modifications stay in place when glued in place. Guess how I figured this out? After I did it retroactively on a couple of parts that refused to stay in place! haha - as they said at my university: "learn by doing" lol Go Mustangs!

cheers

Nick




Joel_W
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Posted: Saturday, December 07, 2019 - 07:26 AM UTC
Nick,
Looking forward to your next update for sure.

Now that's impressive, air brushing in between the rain drops. Dedication to the highest level.

Joel
Stickframe
#362
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Posted: Saturday, December 07, 2019 - 06:39 AM UTC
Hi Michael, Jesper, and Joel,

Glad you guys left some thoughts -

Michael, this build is 95% OOB - Iíve added a few wires here and there, made the throttle linkage, and added the belts, which are foil from wine bottles. So, Iím really looking forward to your 917k! Iíve seen some builds of these and they look to be both a real challenge and well worth the effort.

Hi Jesper, thanks, and I agree with you! Itís too bad it will be impossible to see most of this....MFH makes 1/12 scale engine kits which are really nice! and would be a nice display piece on their own. You might take a look at their website to see them - they look great.

Hi Joel, good ďeyeĒ as always!

So, in no particular order, the headers - thanks! Iíve got to say this required some parts cleanup, and time spent looking back and forth between the parts and instructions. Followed by several test fits. But, it all worked as the instructions say they do.

As for the fuel line, it came with the kit. It is small diameter, smoked/clear rubber. I think youíre probably right about the color not being exactly right. My reference photos show it as being generally off-white. Iím going to leave theses as they are - but, I did decide that I really didnít like that clear tube feeding the injector pump (in the last pics above) so I replaced it with a braided line.

Like most of the parts so far, that tiny distributor came with faint pin marks where each hole needed to be drilled. I did a two part drilling of each starting with a #78 bit making a pilot hole, followed by a re-bore with a #72. Itís some slow going, but the results are nice.

As you note, the red and black lines, they are included in the kit, which is a nice touch. Iím going to give them a wash to tone them down a bit. After drilling out the distributor, you have to place a few small looms around the engine for the wires to be threaded through - which is a real test of patience - youíll see the same on the fuel lines.

I ordered some metal etching primer for the remaining module of the chassis. Iím working on it this weekend. As itís been raining here, Iíve been running outside to spray whenever it lets up! Last night, the metal primer (clear and smells awful!) this morning the tamiya Grey, and later today a silver base. Then, Iíll hit it with various acrylic washes.

Ok gents, happy model building!

Nick
Joel_W
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Posted: Wednesday, December 04, 2019 - 02:32 AM UTC
Nick,
Just a fantastic job on the Porsche 3L 908/3 opposed flat-8 (Boxer type) engine that only cranked out 350 or so hp, but that was cutting edge back in those days. I love the white metal fuel injection metering unit as it's really well detailed. One thing I never understood is why did MFH bother to mold a detailed flywheel that can't possibly ever be seen once you attach the gearbox? Still a really nice touch. And just how did you ever manage to drill out that distributor cap? Every hole is dead on perfect.

You did your usual outstanding job of running ignition wires and fuel lines. I really like the effect of the Red & Black ignition wires for each cylinder set of spark plugs. made it easy for the mechanics to keep track of which is which.

Please don't take this as any kind of criticism, as it's more of a question, a statement, and my personal view (which means very little. Just ask my wife). Nearly everyone uses a clear Yellowish fuel line. But that would only be correct if it's had fuel running through it for a while. The lines are clear when 1st installed. So I use clear lines as all my builds represent a new car with a new engine. Just a small point that only a gearhead like me would spot and wonder about.

As for the exhausts, OMG !! you just nailed them as they certainly look quite difficult to get dead on right. Another reason why I shy away from the Gurney AAR Eagle with the V12 Gurney Westlake engine.

Joel
Hwa-Rang
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Posted: Tuesday, December 03, 2019 - 11:15 PM UTC
Stunning work. The engine would make a great display on it's own.