login   |    register
Cars: Muscle Cars
60's & 70's Classics
AMT new tool Chrysler 300C (commissioned)
AussieReg
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
#007
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Victoria, Australia
Joined: June 09, 2009
KitMaker: 8,156 posts
Auto Modeler: 2,953 posts
Posted: Saturday, February 02, 2019 - 09:41 AM UTC
Gabriel, that looks absolutely amazing! Super high shine and beautifully neat work my friend.


Quoted Text

I decided to mask from the sides this time, using the pre-cut edges of the tape. I also spent a few moments and plucked with a fine pair of tweezers the "paper hairs" where the cut was more rough.



This is my method every time. I don't trust my hand or a new blade as much as a fresh tape edge wherever possible.

I'm so glad that your client approves, positive obscenities reinforcing the success!

Cheers, D
Szmann
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Netherlands Antilles
Joined: September 02, 2014
KitMaker: 1,977 posts
Auto Modeler: 1,371 posts
Posted: Saturday, February 02, 2019 - 10:21 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Gabriel, that looks absolutely amazing! Super high shine and beautifully neat work my friend.


Thank you, D., much appreciated!


Quoted Text


This is my method every time. I don't trust my hand or a new blade as much as a fresh tape edge wherever possible.


I would normally do the same, but I guess I let myself confused by the width of the tape.


Quoted Text


I'm so glad that your client approves, positive obscenities reinforcing the success!



I think, yes, he's genuinely happy!

Thanks, D., again. Your appreciation really matters!
Gabriel
Stickframe
#362
_VISITCOMMUNITY
California, United States
Joined: December 01, 2013
KitMaker: 1,661 posts
Auto Modeler: 431 posts
Posted: Saturday, February 02, 2019 - 10:45 AM UTC
Hi Gabriel - “wow” is simply too much of an understatement - the body looks beautiful! Very sexy in the limited light pic! Lol. As much of a headache as it was to strip and redo, the end result seems worth the effort.

Cheers
Nick
Szmann
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Netherlands Antilles
Joined: September 02, 2014
KitMaker: 1,977 posts
Auto Modeler: 1,371 posts
Posted: Saturday, February 02, 2019 - 10:59 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Gabriel - “wow” is simply too much of an understatement - the body looks beautiful! Very sexy in the limited light pic! Lol. As much of a headache as it was to strip and redo, the end result seems worth the effort.

Cheers
Nick



Hi, Nick! Yes, I like it better in low light as well but now is sitting too high on the stand and the reflection doesn't advantage it. The final pictures will be much better, I promise

Cheers!
Gabriel
Joel_W
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New York, United States
Joined: December 04, 2010
KitMaker: 11,666 posts
Auto Modeler: 2,974 posts
Posted: Sunday, February 03, 2019 - 03:05 AM UTC
Gabriel,
Wow!! a perfect paint and then a perfect gloss finish . My only question concerning it is which of the 3 color body pictures is the correct color in room light? I've become so accustom to the 1st one, but from your description, #3 is what one would see up close and personal.

As for your assessment of the Tamiya tapes: 10mm, 18mm, 40mm, you've made some very interesting observations. Personally I only use Tamiya 10mm & 18mm tape, plus a generic 3mm tape, and Tamiya's Vinyl curvable tape. Like you, I did feel when I tried the Tamiya 40mm tape, that it contained more adhesive, and pulled up acrylic paint (especially water based paints like Mig), but not lacquer on a lacquer base as a general rule. Taking no chances, I used up the roll for taping glued up sections of aircraft fuselages and wings till the roll was finally gone.

the 10mm & 18mm have always preformed flawlessly, and very consistently. But I've always been super careful in body prep before priming or painting no matter the general rule that lacquer will eat through oils and various contaminants.

I follow a lot of Paul Budzik's procedures, and creating a clean edge on tape is one of them. Mostly It's done before being applied to the body. The key for me was not to cut the tape on a cutting mat, but rather using a piece of safety glass or acrylic with a steel edge. And I always use a new #11 blade for that as well as cutting decals. Hence, I do go through a lot of #11 blades until Paul showed how he dresses them up for added life. Honestly, I've been just to lazy to buy a new stone for that purpose.

This time you produced an absolutely perfect color coat, followed by another perfect 2k clear Urethane coat.

Going back to the start of your massive paint session, the gas tank whether or not is the correct color, really looks quite good, and adds more contrast and interest to the underside.

My only observation, and question is that when you have the bottom of the chassis facing up, the rear left corner has what looks like raised lettering, which I'm thinkinh is AMT's copyright and date. Will that show on the finished model?

Joel
Szmann
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Netherlands Antilles
Joined: September 02, 2014
KitMaker: 1,977 posts
Auto Modeler: 1,371 posts
Posted: Sunday, February 03, 2019 - 12:39 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Gabriel,
Wow!! a perfect paint and then a perfect gloss finish . My only question concerning it is which of the 3 color body pictures is the correct color in room light? I've become so accustom to the 1st one, but from your description, #3 is what one would see up close and personal.



What a monster I've created! Thankfully the alchemy and body snatching is not illegal in Sint Maarten Yes, you are more familiar with the first example, because I took pictures in my photo tent or at the bench, where I have in both instances 5500K light. But in mixed and filtered light, as in the normal environment, the thing turns green. After I have read your post the first time, I took the shell out under bright Caribbean sun and in plain air the color becomes even a darker (and glossier) shade of green, pretty much close to the parade green.
I have worked my mind hard today to find an explanation, because even for me seems odd, since I have used only solid colors from Rust-oleum range (black, white, chrome yellow and harbor blue). For some reason that eludes me now, I started finding the shade with a tonal mix instead of a hue mix (I guess I was just playing around). That means that accidentally I have mixed two different blue pigments (the one from the harbor blue and the one from the black) in very close to 50% proportion each and the color shade hangs precariously in balance on a very narrow temperature range. (I remember I was complaining about the weakness of the pigment in the harbor blue and saying at the time that I would have been better off with cobalt blue). Other than that is just weird (and interesting)


Quoted Text


As for your assessment of the Tamiya tapes: 10mm, 18mm, 40mm, you've made some very interesting observations. Personally I only use Tamiya 10mm & 18mm tape, plus a generic 3mm tape, and Tamiya's Vinyl curvable tape. Like you, I did feel when I tried the Tamiya 40mm tape, that it contained more adhesive, and pulled up acrylic paint (especially water based paints like Mig), but not lacquer on a lacquer base as a general rule. Taking no chances, I used up the roll for taping glued up sections of aircraft fuselages and wings till the roll was finally gone.

the 10mm & 18mm have always preformed flawlessly, and very consistently. But I've always been super careful in body prep before priming or painting no matter the general rule that lacquer will eat through oils and various contaminants.


I had Tamiya 18mm since long, but I never had the need to use it until now. And definitely it kicked off my bench the 40mm sister.


Quoted Text


I follow a lot of Paul Budzik's procedures, and creating a clean edge on tape is one of them. Mostly It's done before being applied to the body. The key for me was not to cut the tape on a cutting mat, but rather using a piece of safety glass or acrylic with a steel edge. And I always use a new #11 blade for that as well as cutting decals. Hence, I do go through a lot of #11 blades until Paul showed how he dresses them up for added life. Honestly, I've been just to lazy to buy a new stone for that purpose.


Budzik is also one of my favorites youtubers grace to his scientific approach. Here in Caribbean I am compelled to buy only stainless steel blades. The carbon steel ones dull before the day's end, by next day have rusty spots and in the third day they are all rust. The Stainless blades come also with disadvantages: they are softer than the CS ones and more expensive. I sharpen them using the Japanese method on a hard core fine nail buffer.


Quoted Text


This time you produced an absolutely perfect color coat, followed by another perfect 2k clear Urethane coat.


Well, both of them had imperfections, (the clear still have) but I agree: probably is one of the best paint jobs I ever managed (motivated by the first mistake)


Quoted Text


Going back to the start of your massive paint session, the gas tank whether or not is the correct color, really looks quite good, and adds more contrast and interest to the underside.


I found today some better references with the underside of the car: the color is wrong - it should have been black, but I take the license


Quoted Text


My only observation, and question is that when you have the bottom of the chassis facing up, the rear left corner has what looks like raised lettering, which I'm thinkinh is AMT's copyright and date. Will that show on the finished model?



Yes, is a stamp there incriminating AMT. It reads 2006 - so they have used a bottom pan from another model I haven't decided yet if stays there or not - I'll let Luigi decide.

Thank you for following so closely my build - your multitude of questions ensures me you are closely interested in the build. I feel honored!

Gabriel
Hwa-Rang
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Kobenhavn, Denmark
Joined: June 29, 2004
KitMaker: 6,760 posts
Auto Modeler: 2,182 posts
Posted: Sunday, February 03, 2019 - 07:16 PM UTC
I'm happy to see you've recovered the paint job. Looks awesome, what a shine. Will definitely try 2K gloss coat, in the near future.

The chassis looks awesome as well. Painting the fuel tank was a good call, adding tonal variation and I do believe it was this way from the factory.

I agree, wuth Joel, the hob caps need a wash and I doubt a grey wash will do the trick. I have seen some pretty amazing result with Tamiy smoke on chrome. Haven't tried it my self though.
Joel_W
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New York, United States
Joined: December 04, 2010
KitMaker: 11,666 posts
Auto Modeler: 2,974 posts
Posted: Monday, February 04, 2019 - 01:35 AM UTC
Gabriel,
Of course I follow your builds and each and every update with the upmost attention to all your details, observations, & experimentations. it's both fun, and certainly educational. So much so that I now find that much of it answers my questions, and I don't have to do much if any testing myself.

Interesting point about the Salt air and what effect it has on CS #11 vs the usual SS ones. I've never heard of using a hard nail file, which is interesting, and certainly a lot cheaper then buying another Japanese dressing stone which are very expensive, and then the mess with light machine oil, all for just a simple and inexpensive #11 blade. But the hard nail file or files seem like a better and cheaper way to go. Just have to find them. What grade or grades do you use?

Joel
Joel_W
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New York, United States
Joined: December 04, 2010
KitMaker: 11,666 posts
Auto Modeler: 2,974 posts
Posted: Monday, February 04, 2019 - 01:44 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I'm happy to see you've recovered the paint job. Looks awesome, what a shine. Will definitely try 2K gloss coat, in the near future.

The chassis looks awesome as well. Painting the fuel tank was a good call, adding tonal variation and I do believe it was this way from the factory.

I agree, wuth Joel, the hob caps need a wash and I doubt a grey wash will do the trick. I have seen some pretty amazing result with Tamiy smoke on chrome. Haven't tried it my self though.




Jasper,
I've got a few bottles of smoke that I rarely to never use: Tamiya's (like most of us), and Ammo by Mig's. I'm going to try the Mig's as it's Acrylic based and see what the effect is like. The Tamiya panel line washes are really just for that purpose. While others have had excellent results using it for overall filters, I've found the results to be mixed with the occasional damage to the clear sealer coat. That alone is strange as their enamel based.

As for a true 2K finish, the Urethane kits are very expensive from Gravity & Zero. Forget dealing with the sole USA supplier as he's always out of stock on most Zero products, and other Online dealers from other countries won't ship to the USA as per contract. But Gravity of Spain; not Matt from Florida/USA (many issues and threads of such) is fantastic. 3 day shipping to the USA for $7, 24/7 customer service that actually picks up the phone or returns emails promptly, and their products are the best of the best, and not one out of stock after 6 orders in the last year.

I'd watch a few vids from some of the car guys to get a feel for the product as it's not like anything else you've used before. Gabriel is a master at it, while I'm still more then leery about making the move.

Joel
Szmann
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Netherlands Antilles
Joined: September 02, 2014
KitMaker: 1,977 posts
Auto Modeler: 1,371 posts
Posted: Monday, February 04, 2019 - 03:28 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Gabriel,

Interesting point about the Salt air and what effect it has on CS #11 vs the usual SS ones. I've never heard of using a hard nail file, which is interesting, and certainly a lot cheaper then buying another Japanese dressing stone which are very expensive, and then the mess with light machine oil, all for just a simple and inexpensive #11 blade. But the hard nail file or files seem like a better and cheaper way to go. Just have to find them. What grade or grades do you use?

Joel



Joel these nail buffers are not coming in grit grades so I cannot be specific. I usually buy the fine or extrafine grade. The gradation is very different from manufacturer to manufacturer and very inconsistent in the same manufacturer's range. You just need to enter a cosmetic store and grab one (the one that feels very fine to the touch)
An example here, with the sharpening marks with :


The only "secret" is to have hard core, not the sponge one.

Gabriel
Szmann
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Netherlands Antilles
Joined: September 02, 2014
KitMaker: 1,977 posts
Auto Modeler: 1,371 posts
Posted: Monday, February 04, 2019 - 03:55 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I'm happy to see you've recovered the paint job. Looks awesome, what a shine. Will definitely try 2K gloss coat, in the near future.

The chassis looks awesome as well. Painting the fuel tank was a good call, adding tonal variation and I do believe it was this way from the factory.

I agree, wuth Joel, the hob caps need a wash and I doubt a grey wash will do the trick. I have seen some pretty amazing result with Tamiy smoke on chrome. Haven't tried it my self though.




Jasper,
I've got a few bottles of smoke that I rarely to never use: Tamiya's (like most of us), and Ammo by Mig's. I'm going to try the Mig's as it's Acrylic based and see what the effect is like. The Tamiya panel line washes are really just for that purpose. While others have had excellent results using it for overall filters, I've found the results to be mixed with the occasional damage to the clear sealer coat. That alone is strange as their enamel based.

As for a true 2K finish, the Urethane kits are very expensive from Gravity & Zero. Forget dealing with the sole USA supplier as he's always out of stock on most Zero products, and other Online dealers from other countries won't ship to the USA as per contract. But Gravity of Spain; not Matt from Florida/USA (many issues and threads of such) is fantastic. 3 day shipping to the USA for $7, 24/7 customer service that actually picks up the phone or returns emails promptly, and their products are the best of the best, and not one out of stock after 6 orders in the last year.

I'd watch a few vids from some of the car guys to get a feel for the product as it's not like anything else you've used before. Gabriel is a master at it, while I'm still more then leery about making the move.

Joel



Jesper and Joel, the question comes right on time: I have used Tamiya smoke for effects on metallics, but usually give a "steel" appearance which is not to be desired here.
The post shading or filtered technique it is still something I have to look into, and is scheduled for my Fokker Eindecker which awaits completion...
As Joel, I was initially disappointed by Tamyia smoke (and all their acrylics at that) until I have discovered MLT.
Double-checking my references, I have realized my wheels are not even ready, because I forgot all about the red circle! :



On 2K:
Joel, Jesper is based in Northern Europe and perhaps is more easy for him to find it. For American market you have SprayGunner - very close to you, in Florida, with a brand called "No Name" which I use just now (on both New Beetle and Chrysler). This is, in fact, re-packed commercial auto resin (+ hardener and reducer). Another brand with good reviews (I bought it, but never tried it yet) is from Splash Paints (based in Portland and shipping from California). The advantage for Splash is that the hardener and the reducer are pre-mixed and thus easier to use (mix by volume).
The prices are indeed high, but not to scary (I think the smallest re-pack from SprayGunner is 9 USD). Both companies shipped fast and trouble free.
I am considering buying the commercial auto resin [$80 / liter (+ 1/2 liter hardener) in the local auto store - Diamond variety, considered the best]. The total mixed volume will be roughly 2 liters for 100 dollars (reducer included). For comparison, for Chrysler I have mixed 20ml (10+5+5), and it was too much: I have barely used 15ml. On rough calculus, from 2 liters I can spray 133 models or more (the Chrysler is a hefty one)! (effective cost 75 cents / model).
The application of 2K is actually more forgiving than clear lacquers because has much lesser tendency to run. The preparation is messy (three pipettes or rinse the pipette with acetone to avoid contamination), sticky invisible "traps" all over and also you need aggressive cleaning solutions for AB (no problem with my H&S Evolution). And, oh boy! it really stinks!

I definitely urge both of you to give it a try. The feel of the completed cured and glossy car shell in your hand is comparable with holding a light bulb (old pear shaped ones )!

Cheers!
Gabriel
Joel_W
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New York, United States
Joined: December 04, 2010
KitMaker: 11,666 posts
Auto Modeler: 2,974 posts
Posted: Monday, February 04, 2019 - 07:53 AM UTC
Gabriel,
I keep on thinking that Jasper is from the USA, so he has several options for either Zero or Gravity paints, and 2K systems. I've heard about the smell issue, but since I use a spray booth, I'm hoping that it will negate that issue.

As you already know. My greatest fear is that the 2K hardens in one of my ABs. What do you use as a cleaning agent, and how much working time to you actually have?

Will Patterson did a whole 2k video, and one of his options is going with a commercial real world system. That seems to be a really mandatory option over the long run. Right now Gravity and Zero charge $22-25 for enough to do 3 shells or so. That's pretty expensive both in the short and long runs.

Joel
Szmann
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Netherlands Antilles
Joined: September 02, 2014
KitMaker: 1,977 posts
Auto Modeler: 1,371 posts
Posted: Monday, February 04, 2019 - 11:28 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Gabriel,
I keep on thinking that Jasper is from the USA, so he has several options for either Zero or Gravity paints, and 2K systems.


You are entitled to take him as an American: He must be the only MOPAR fan in Europe!


Quoted Text


As you already know. My greatest fear is that the 2K hardens in one of my ABs. What do you use as a cleaning agent, and how much working time to you actually have?



I clean with acetone. I drain the AB cup immediately after use, I flush with acetone, I dismantle the AB and soak it immediately in the ultrasound cleaner filled with lacquer thinner (my cleaner of choice). I'm not sure exactly the time but it is at least 20 minutes window. My last session (two coats + flashing break) was 17 minutes (according to my video camera) and the resin was perfectly fluid when drained from the mixing cup at the end of the session (I use a graduated glass mixing cup). However, the "fly trap" time window of the sprayed model is about 40 minutes after airbrushing. In this period, the coat will be stickier than glue!


Quoted Text


Will Patterson did a whole 2k video, and one of his options is going with a commercial real world system. That seems to be a really mandatory option over the long run. Right now Gravity and Zero charge $22-25 for enough to do 3 shells or so. That's pretty expensive both in the short and long runs.


I have missed that episode from Will Pattison, but my calculus prove exactly the same: much cheaper in long run: 8 USD versus 75 cents! I bought the medium package from SprayGunner with 19USD and I have sprayed 3 shells so far: Porsche 959, New Beetle and Chrysler. I estimate I still have for another two (or a very large one) shells. The one from Splash paints is much more expensive (I shall say crazy expensive - It better be good!)

Gabriel
RussellE
#306
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Victoria, Australia
Joined: June 27, 2010
KitMaker: 3,957 posts
Auto Modeler: 495 posts
Posted: Tuesday, February 05, 2019 - 12:25 PM UTC
fantastic result on the body Gabriel! Nicely done!
Szmann
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Netherlands Antilles
Joined: September 02, 2014
KitMaker: 1,977 posts
Auto Modeler: 1,371 posts
Posted: Tuesday, February 05, 2019 - 02:17 PM UTC

Quoted Text

fantastic result on the body Gabriel! Nicely done!



Thanks, Russ!

Small update

Being too busy these day to tackle a more lengthy session, I decided to start and "clean" the sprues, quick-painting in the process.
I set for the interior parts, but checking my references, I realized there are two tones of tan:
Here can be seen a pinkish one on the middle segment of the steering column:


And here the dash board and the upholstery show different hues.


I chose not to mix two tones, but to use the "weaknes" of the acrylic colors in my advantage, applying less paint on dash over the gray primer (paler result) and more paint on upholstery (peachier result). The tan was concocted on my table from Liquitex acrylics (I am in love with the fine satin, nearly gloss of these paints) diluted with IPA 70%:


Other than that, I have also applied a clear acrylic coat on the bottom outside pan, but I had no time to put the chassis together.

More updates soon!

Cheers!
Gabriel
Joel_W
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New York, United States
Joined: December 04, 2010
KitMaker: 11,666 posts
Auto Modeler: 2,974 posts
Posted: Wednesday, February 06, 2019 - 02:05 AM UTC
Gabriel,
Nice start to the interior.

I wouldn't put to much into the darker tone of the middle section of the steering column. Good chance that the part was painted with a different batch of paint at some point and just warehoused until the line needed those parts. Back then paint was mixed by written formulas, so no two patches were ever the same.

Very nice job on the dash, as the color really looks like the right shade of black, not to stark, but not to light.

Joel
Szmann
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Netherlands Antilles
Joined: September 02, 2014
KitMaker: 1,977 posts
Auto Modeler: 1,371 posts
Posted: Wednesday, February 06, 2019 - 04:03 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Gabriel,
Nice start to the interior.

I wouldn't put to much into the darker tone of the middle section of the steering column. Good chance that the part was painted with a different batch of paint at some point and just warehoused until the line needed those parts. Back then paint was mixed by written formulas, so no two patches were ever the same.



I totally agree. Even in today's cars, especially the cheap ones, it seems that the different components never match colors perfectly, especially on the dash area. Under the Caribbean sun, the discoloration adds even more to the effect, because matte finishes have the tendency to discolor faster than the glossy ones.

Quoted Text


Very nice job on the dash, as the color really looks like the right shade of black, not to stark, but not to light.

Joel



There is no black there yet, Joel! The area received less of the tan color and the soft light from the photo cube plays the trick There is going to be some "black" on the dash indeed, but the upper half of it.

UPDATE - Those small little things

Well, today I had a "normal" bench session (approx two hours), but it seemed I wasted them in little puny details.

First off, I decided to finish the wheels. I did the red circle, in the middle of each wheel. If before I was pondering if to apply wash or not, now is pretty much mandatory, to hide some of the not so perfect circles:


Another fun thing was to paint the buckets of the front lights. A little more comfortable than the wheels, but still tight spots. I know they're looking a little messy right now, but a pinwash will follow:


Back to wheels, I treated the tires with a dark grey pigment wash (ground chalk + turpentine) to give them a slightly used look and to make the branding and other details a little more visible:


I start detailing the door panels. The lower part should be black, but AMT did it wrong again! The front door has power windows, not cranks!


I need some touch-ups and all, but you can see how the mistake from AMT breaks the outlook of the door inside:




I'll keep the cranks but I am rather disappointed (I wonder if that was an option or standard - I need to find more references)

... and none of these little things are done yet: the doors need silver accents, a wash, panel liner and a clear coat, the dash is not even masked yet, the lights need a pin wash and the lenses, the wheels need a wash and a final clear coat, and the tires need a sartin clear as well, to seal down the pigment...

It was a full session, but feels more like half of it!

Cheers!
Gabriel
Hwa-Rang
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Kobenhavn, Denmark
Joined: June 29, 2004
KitMaker: 6,760 posts
Auto Modeler: 2,182 posts
Posted: Wednesday, February 06, 2019 - 06:22 PM UTC
Did a little research regarding the power windows. Found images of interiors with and without power windows, so I'm guessing it was an option.
Szmann
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Netherlands Antilles
Joined: September 02, 2014
KitMaker: 1,977 posts
Auto Modeler: 1,371 posts
Posted: Thursday, February 07, 2019 - 01:53 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Did a little research regarding the power windows. Found images of interiors with and without power windows, so I'm guessing it was an option.



Thanks, Jesper. Then AMT did it right: a bare stock model which I wanted.

Cheers!
Gabriel
Joel_W
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New York, United States
Joined: December 04, 2010
KitMaker: 11,666 posts
Auto Modeler: 2,974 posts
Posted: Thursday, February 07, 2019 - 02:55 AM UTC
Gabriel,
That's a lot of work for just two hours.

I sense that you're not entirely satisfied with the Red circles in the wheels. If you can remove the paint, 1st run a piece of masking tape on the side from where you want to paint to end to the top of the wheel. You can easily air brush the Red, or hand paint as the paint will try to run down hill, not up and under the tape.

Nice job on the headlight inserts. It makes a huge difference.

Joel
Szmann
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Netherlands Antilles
Joined: September 02, 2014
KitMaker: 1,977 posts
Auto Modeler: 1,371 posts
Posted: Thursday, February 07, 2019 - 03:22 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Gabriel,
That's a lot of work for just two hours.

I sense that you're not entirely satisfied with the Red circles in the wheels. If you can remove the paint, 1st run a piece of masking tape on the side from where you want to paint to end to the top of the wheel. You can easily air brush the Red, or hand paint as the paint will try to run down hill, not up and under the tape.

Nice job on the headlight inserts. It makes a huge difference.

Joel



Thanks for advice, Joel. Yes, is a god idea, definitely better that trying to free hand them by brush, as I did. After a night's sleep I decided to strip and repaint the hubs (perhaps I need to do that with the white inserts too as they are glued together now) and to print my own decal inserts. I don't have a circular cutter and I have no idea how my plotter cuts thru decal paper, but it has came the time to find out. If doesn't work out, I'll definitely try your suggested method.

Gabriel
Joel_W
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New York, United States
Joined: December 04, 2010
KitMaker: 11,666 posts
Auto Modeler: 2,974 posts
Posted: Thursday, February 07, 2019 - 10:20 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Gabriel,
That's a lot of work for just two hours.

I sense that you're not entirely satisfied with the Red circles in the wheels. If you can remove the paint, 1st run a piece of masking tape on the side from where you want to paint to end to the top of the wheel. You can easily air brush the Red, or hand paint as the paint will try to run down hill, not up and under the tape.

Nice job on the headlight inserts. It makes a huge difference.

Joel



Thanks for advice, Joel. Yes, is a god idea, definitely better that trying to free hand them by brush, as I did. After a night's sleep I decided to strip and repaint the hubs (perhaps I need to do that with the white inserts too as they are glued together now) and to print my own decal inserts. I don't have a circular cutter and I have no idea how my plotter cuts thru decal paper, but it has came the time to find out. If doesn't work out, I'll definitely try your suggested method.

Gabriel




Gabriel,
If anyone can do it, you certainly can.

Joel
Szmann
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Netherlands Antilles
Joined: September 02, 2014
KitMaker: 1,977 posts
Auto Modeler: 1,371 posts
Posted: Thursday, February 07, 2019 - 02:59 PM UTC
Joel, thank you for the vote of confidence. Now I have to prove it as well

UPDATE - They don't do them like that anymore

The interior parts were sprayed with Micro Satin and, when dried, washed with Bourgeois LaFrance transparent brown oil. Since I haven't used this oil in a long while, I forgot how strong this pigment is and the effect is a little starker than I wanted, but not to worry - in the shade of the interior, they're not going to "scream":


The storage area at the back I sprayed it trying a new method (again!). I mixed the paint a little thicker than I normally do for airbrushing and I lowered the pressure, to achieve splattering, in intention to replicate some textured surface. And splatter it did, but it is difficult to control it and the result is so-so; the method has a better application in weathering I guess:


The cherry on the pie it was - no doubt - detailing the door cards and the dashboard. The finish requires three different metallic finishes, which I have achieved in three different methods. The panel was masked and sprayed with Alclad polished aluminum. The thin strips were picked up with a silver Sharpie and the ashtray lid and the insert by the crank were done in BMF. Lots of fun, but at the back of my mind was all the time a thought of great consideration for the quality the original product has at the finish level. Inevitably, I was thinking that "They don't do them like that anymore ":


The dash is even more complicated, needing under-painting for dials and decals, and this is the current stage (sorry for the upside-down picture, but is the only way to make the under-dash detail visible):


... and of course, the wheels: stripped down and waiting for new paint and detailing:


And Joel can deny it as much as he desires: if wasn't for his example, I'll never go back to those [ ] wheels!

Cheers!
Gabriel
Hwa-Rang
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Kobenhavn, Denmark
Joined: June 29, 2004
KitMaker: 6,760 posts
Auto Modeler: 2,182 posts
Posted: Thursday, February 07, 2019 - 06:50 PM UTC
I'm impressed with the detail work AMT have put into this model. Door crankes aren't just a shadow of something resembling a window crank. The stitching of the seat's looks good as well.
you could tone down, the wash, on the seats, by adding a wash of the base coat.
Joel_W
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New York, United States
Joined: December 04, 2010
KitMaker: 11,666 posts
Auto Modeler: 2,974 posts
Posted: Friday, February 08, 2019 - 02:45 AM UTC
Gabriel,
I highly doubt it's my example that made you go back and redo anything. Actually, I got that from following your builds.

I went back and looked at the real seat pictures you posted. Clearly they're from worn/used seats. How well I still remember my Mother making me clean the white leather seats in their Pontiac Grand Prix after I washed their car. And you guys thought that slavery was dead I think that rather then trying to lighten up the wash, I apply a very light filter of black/brown to represent soil and body oils.

You really did the door side cards justice with three different procedures that yielded 3 different chrome looks. I also do remember how shiny and bright the interior chrome was back then. Looking forward to how you approach the dash.

Joel